All too often we do cardio in only one plane of motion. Actually, not only in one plane of motion, but also in one directions – forward. We run forward. We use the elliptical moving forward. We even ride the bike and move forward.

That is why anytime there is a piece of equipment that allows us to get our sweat on while moving in a different direction than forward, or backward, it should always be included in our workout routine to help make sure we are functionally strong in every direction.

That is why the Slide Boards are a great piece of cardio equipment to use that can also be used to strengthen your entire body.

Slide Boards build glute and leg strength and really work on your external rotators and even you inner thighs. Basically, they work everything done the outside and inside of your legs as well as your glutes.

Actually, Slide Boards are great for anyone coming back from a knee injury and can be used as you advance with your rehab program because they strengthen the muscles used to stabilize the knees.

And if you get creative, you can also use Slide Boards to work your core and upper body as well.

Here are 21 Slide Board Exercises you can use to strengthen your entire body while also getting your blood pumping!

21 Slide Board Exercises

These 21 Slide Board Exercises will help you get in a great full-body workout.

For many of these moves, if you don’t have a Slide Board, you can use Valslides, Gliders or even towels or paper plates.

Traditional Slide Board “Sprints” – If you want to build great leg strength, power and endurance, you need to use the Slide Boards to do the traditional sprint back and forth. Whether you choose to do short intervals and actually sprint to build strength and power or you choose to do longer intervals and build your endurance, this is a must-do move.

There are a couple of ways to do the Traditional Slide Board Movement. Speed Skaters use it different than Hockey Players do. For many of us simply using the Slide Board for exercise, a more “Hockey style movement” may be best.

To do the Slide Board Sprint, start to one side of the board up with your outside foot up against the edge. Bend your knees and even lift your inside foot up to really load that outside leg and glute. Swing your arms across your body toward that outside leg and then push off that outside foot to push yourself across the board.

Swing your arms as you slide across the board. Do not shift and apply too much pressure to that inside foot or you may stop yourself.

Push yourself all the way across the board so your other foot hits the edge. Load that glute and leg and even lift your inside leg to push off the edge to glide back across. Swing your arms toward the outside leg to help load and propel you back across.

As you glide across, swing your arms toward the other side. You can stay lower to get more power and move faster across the board. This will also really work your legs.

When you hit the edge you can perform almost a Heisman-like movement to really load that leg against the edge.

Move quickly back and forth. If you are sprinting, choose a shorter interval and really move quickly. If you are building endurance, you will want to go for a longer interval and you will not go as quickly because you will want to make it the entire time at a steady pace.

Beginners may need to use an adjustable board and a shorter distance.

Lunge Run – Take Lunges to the next level and really toast your legs while getting your blood pumping with the Lunge Run. This move is a great low-impact version of the Split Squat Jump; however, it is, in many ways, an even more challenging exercise.

This move will improve your balance, core and leg strength while also really getting your heart rate up.

To do the Lunge Run, start standing on the Slide Board with your feet together. Then slide one foot backward and sink into a deep lunge. Drop your back knee down toward the board as you bend your front knee to about 90 degrees. Bring the opposite arm forward to the leg that is forward so you can use your arms a bit to help power the switch from lunge to lunge. Make sure to keep your front heel down as you sink into the lunge.

Then drive up out of the lunge and as you do, slide your back foot forward as you slide your front foot back. Sink into a lunge on the other side as you swing your back arm forward and your forward arm back.

You will not leave the ground as you switch lunges, but simply slide each foot to the other position.

Keep your core tight as you change and your chest up. Do not round or hunch over. Try to keep your weight balanced.

Move as quickly as possible as you sink deep into each lunge.

To regress this move, beginners can do Alternating Reverse Lunges. Plus, this move can be done with sliders if you don’t have a Slide Board.

Alternating Side Lunges – If you want to work your glutes and your inner thighs, you must do Alternating Side Lunges on the Slide Board. By sliding the straight leg in and out as you sink into the Side Lunge, you can really work your inner thighs (they have to “pull” that foot back in to help you come back up to standing).

Be careful the first time you do this move, whether it is on the Slide Board or using sliders. When you slide your foot out to sink into the lunge, don’t slide it out too far the first time or you won’t be able to pull it back in and you risk straining your inner thigh.

To do Alternating Side Lunges on the Slide Board, start standing tall so that you have room to sink into a lunge and slide your feet out to each side. Then slide one leg out to the side as you bend your standing leg and push your butt back.

Sink into as deep a lunge as you can while keeping your standing heel down and the leg you slide out straight. Sit your butt back as you sink down. Do not be afraid to hinge at the hips, but do not round your back or hunch over as you sink down.

Then driving through your standing heel, pull your foot back in and come back up to standing. Do not bend the knee of the leg you slide out as you come back up to standing. Really feel yourself pull that leg back in with your inner thigh as you use the glute of your standing leg to drive back up.

Squeeze your glutes at the top and then switch and slide the other leg out to sink into a Side Lunge on that side.

With these lunges only go as low as you can while still being able to pull your foot back in with one smooth movement. Also, make sure you load your glutes and really sit your butt back.

You can do this move with sliders or even stay on one side instead of alternating. Beginners may even want to start with the Low Lunge with Side Slides.

Skater Squat: Side and Backward Slides – A great way to really work your legs and develop stability and strength is the Skater Squat with Slides (aka the Low Lunge with Slides). This is also a great move for anyone with knee pain that can’t really sink into deep Squats or Lunges. Plus this move will help build your core strength as you work to stay balanced.

This move is very similar to the Skater Squats with Touches, which can be done if you don’t have a Slide Board or sliders.

To do the Skater Squat with Slides, start standing tall with your feet together. Then sink into a little squat, pushing your butt back as you sit down. This squat will look like chair pose. You don’t need your butt to sink all the way to 90 degrees, but you do want to sit your butt back and down with your legs close together.

While it is ok to lean forward a bit, especially to counter balances with the slides, you do not want to round or hunch over. Brace your abs and keep your core tight.

Then you can perform Side Slides or Backward Slides.

To do Side Slides, stay in the squat and slide one leg out to the side. Stay nice and low as you slide out and really feel your standing leg work to keep you stabile and balanced.

Slide the foot back in and then slide the foot out to the other side. Your weight will shift but you do not want to lean away or stand up out of the squat.

Stay nice and low as you “lunge” from side to side. Also, make sure your chest doesn’t cave forward and that you don’t round your back as you hold and slide out to the side.

To do the Backward Slides, stay in the nice squat and slightly hinge forward. Then slide one leg straight back as you stay in the squat. You should be in a low lunge with the back leg straight.

Then slide the foot back in and slide the other one straight back. Stay low as you alternate Backward Slides. Do not stand up out of the squat or round forward as you hold.

The lower you sink as you perform the slides, the harder the move will be. Do not rush the slides too much, especially if it means you come up out of the squat or shift a lot from side to side. You want to really focus on staying low and balanced to build your stability and strength.

Skater Squat with Circles – This is another great move to really build your leg strength and stability while also creating mobility around your hip. The Skater Squat with Circles is a great variation of the Skater Squat with Slides to really help build your leg strength even if you have knee pain.

To do the Skater Squat with Circles, start standing with your feet together to one side of the Slide Boar. Sink down into a little squat, pushing your butt back.

Then slide one leg out and forward as you begin to draw a big circle. Slide the foot forward then out to the side, around and back before finally bringing the foot back in close to your standing leg.

Repeat, drawing another circle.

Make the circle as big as you can while staying low in the squat. Do not lean away or start to stand up out of the squat just to make the circle bigger. You want to really force your standing leg to work to stabilize as you open up your hip to draw the circle.

Move slowly and keep your chest up. You can hinge forward slightly at the hips, but do not round or hunch forward. Complete all reps on one side before switching.

Glute Bridge And Curl – The Glute Bridge and Curl is a killer hamstring and core exercise, which is why beginners may need to start with a single leg variation.

Make sure with this move that you feel your hamstrings working to curl your feet back in and your glutes and abs supporting. You do not want your low back to engage during this move.

To do the Single-Leg Glute Bridge And Curl, the easier version of the two, lie on your back with your hands either holding the end of the Slide Board behind your head or with your arms down by your sides and your elbows driving into the ground.

Bring your feet in close to your butt and bridge up, driving through your heels and upper back and even arms. Squeeze your glutes and brace your abs.

Then, without letting your hips sag, slide one leg out straight. Slide your foot out then curl your heel back in toward your glute. Feel your hamstring working to pull your foot back in. Keep your hips up as you curl back in and don’t let your butt sag.

Slide the other foot out next. Keep your abs and glutes engaged so that you don’t let your butt sag down onto the board. However, even though you are keeping your hips up in the bridge, do not hyperextend your low back just to get your hips up higher.

You can even use the Pelvic Tilt to keep the abs engaged.

Alternate sliding each foot out, making sure to use your hamstring to pull the foot back in.

To advance the Single Leg Glute Bridge And Curl, you can do a Two-Leg Glute Bridge And Curl Variation. Make sure that when you advance to this variation, you can still keep your hips up and core engaged without your low back taking over.

To do the Two-Leg Glute Bridge And Curl, set up in a glute bridge with either your arms by your sides and elbows driving down into the ground or your hands holding the end of the Slide Board overhead (you can hold the Slide Board if you find you slide on the board even when driving your elbows down into it).

With your feet in close to your glutes, bridge up and engage your core. Then slide both legs out straight in front of you. As you slide your legs out, your hips should lower; however, you do not want your butt to sag to the ground. You still want to keep your core engaged as you extend out.

Then pull your heels back in toward your glutes as you come back up into the bridge in one fluid motion. Do not pull your heels in and then bridge up. You should bridge up as you pull your heels back in.

Feel your hamstrings work to curl your heels in. Use the pelvic tilt if you need to make sure your low back doesn’t engage.

Repeat the Bridge And Curl, extending your legs out again before curling them back in.

Do not advance to the Two Leg Variation if you can’t keep your hips up or extend your legs all the way out together.

Sliding Squat Jacks – If you want a leg and core killer that is sure to get you out of breath, then the Sliding Squat Jack is the move for you. This move will toast your entire leg, but especially your inner and outer thighs.

To do the Slide Squat Jack, start standing with your legs close together. Then sink into a little squat, pushing your butt back as you reach your hands up overhead. This squat will look like a version of Chair Pose.

Staying low, slide both feet out to the sides so that your legs are at least shoulder-width apart. Reach down toward the ground as you stay in the low squat. You may even sink a bit lower as you slide your legs open and reach toward the ground.

Then, staying low, slide your feet back in and come back to the squat with your arms reaching overhead. Repeat the move, sliding your feet back out.

Stay low the entire time.

Beginners may not be able to sink as low. They may also need to slide one foot out at a time instead of both out together or perform the Squat Jack not on the Slide Board. Sliding your legs open and closed at the same time on the Slide Board makes this move very challenging.

Curtsy Lunge – Another great glute and leg move is the Curtsy Lunge on the Slide Board. This move will really work the outside of your glutes as you sink the leg back and behind into the lunge. Plus this move gets you lunging in a different plane of motion instead of just having you move forward, backward or even sideways.

To do the Curtsy Lunge, start standing with your feet together. Then slide one foot back and behind the other leg as you sink into a deep lunge.

Keep your hips facing forward as you reach one leg back and behind, dropping the back knee down toward the ground as you bend your front knee to about 90 degrees. You should feel the outside of that front glute as you sink into the lunge.

Driving through that front foot, come back up to standing, sliding your back foot back forward.

You can then either repeat on the same side or alternate sides, sliding the other foot back and behind as you sink into a deep lunge.

Make sure to keep your chest up as you lunge and really sit back to load that standing glute. Also, make sure you don’t rotate open too much or you won’t load the front glute.

Forward to Backward Lunge – A great move to work your legs while also improving your balance and core stability is the Forward to Backward Lunge.

This move is challenging because it requires a lot of balance to slide forward and backward from one lunge to the other. Make sure to move slowly and stay under control.

To do the Forward to Backward Lunge, start standing tall with your feet together. Then slide one foot forward and sink into a deep lunge, dropping the back knee down as you bend the front knee to about 90 degrees. Make sure that, even though you slide forward, your weight isn’t all going forward. You want to make sure your front heel stays down so you can drive off of it and use your glute to slide back up to standing.

After lunging forward, slide your foot back and come back up to standing. Then slide your foot back behind you and sink into a Backward Lunge.

Drop your back knee down as you bend your front knee toward 90 degrees. Sink into a deep lunge and then drive through your front heel to help you slide your foot back forward to come back up to standing.

Repeat, sliding your foot forward to lunge forward.

Keep your chest up and core engaged as you go from lunge to lunge. You may find your standing leg has to work hard to keep you balanced as you slide from lunge to lunge.

Also, make sure that you drive through that front heel, in both lunges, to engage your glute and help you come back up to standing. You do not want to rock forward onto the ball of your foot.

You can complete all reps on one side or alternate sides after both lunges are complete.

Burpee – The Burpee is one of those moves we all love to hate. It is truly a full-body, cardio exercise. And the Slide Board variation is a great way to really focus on your core while getting your heart rate up. It is also a low impact Burpee variation that you can do on sliders if you don’t have a Slide Board.

To do the Slide Board Burpee, start standing tall with your feet close together. Then squat down and bend over to place your hands on the ground.

With your hands on the ground, slide your feet back so that you are in a Plank position with your hands under your shoulders. Then slide your feet back into your hands and stand back up, squeezing your glutes at the top.

Move quickly and repeat, placing your hands back down on the ground as you slide back into a Plank position.

You can also add in Mountain Climbers or even Knee Tucks while in this Plank position to add some variation and even some extra challenge.

Inchworm – The Inchworm is a great full-body, core-intensive exercise that not only strengthens but also stretches. It can stretch your hamstrings and open up your chest and hips as it works your legs, glutes, abs, back, shoulders and arms.

To do the Inchworm, start standing tall on one side of the Slide Board. Then, keeping your legs straight, walk your hands out until you are in the Plank position.

In the Plank position, drop your hips and arch up into an Upward Facing Dog position. You should drop your hips toward the ground as you press your chest out and look up toward the ceiling. Do not shrug your shoulders as you open your chest up. Squeeze your glutes to stretch your hips more and protect your low back.

Then push your butt up in the air and slide your feet into your hands. You can then stand up or go straight back into the Inchworm.

Repeat, walking your hands back out before moving into Upward Facing Dog and then sliding your feet back in. Try to slide your feet in as close to your hands as you can and feel your hamstrings stretching.

Try to keep your legs straight through the entire movement and really stretch your hamstrings as you walk out and pull your legs back in.

Posterior Plank to L-Sit – Your core includes everything down your frontside and your backside. That is why the Posterior Plank to L-Sit is a great move. It works your glutes, abs, shoulders, back, hamstrings and quads.

It is also a more advanced movement. Beginners may need to start with a simple Posterior Plank or just the L-Sit. They can also keep their legs more bent during the movement to make it easier.

If you don’t have a Slide Board, you can do this using sliders or even in the Suspension Trainer (click here for the Suspension Trainer Posterior Plank to L-Sit).

To do the Posterior Plank to L-Sit, sit on the Slide Board with your legs out straight in front of you and your hands behind your butt on the ground. You can turn your fingertips back toward your butt.

Then, driving through your hands and heels, bridge your hips up toward the ceiling. Your feet will slide out as you press your chest out and squeeze your glutes to bridge up. You can relax your head back as you bridge up. Make sure to really squeeze your glutes and brace your core so that your low back doesn’t engage as you bridge.

Then lower your hips back down to about an inch off the ground and slide your butt back between your hands, keeping your legs out straight. Use your abs and upper body to really pull your butt back between your hands.

Repeat the move, sliding your legs back out in front to bridge back up. Do not slide too far out though and put too much strain on your shoulders. Also, when you bridge up really squeeze your glutes and press your chest out.

Then lower back down and pull your butt back between your hands again to do an L-Sit.

Make sure that you don’t shrug your shoulders as you do this move. Really think about keeping your chest out and shoulders down and back.

Plank with Knee Tuck – Work the entire frontside of your core with this Plank with Knee Tucks. It is a great way to work your shoulders, abs and quads. Plus, while you work your core, you can also get your heart rate up!

To do the Plank with Knee Tucks, set up in a Plank position with your hands under your shoulders and your body in a nice straight line to your heels. Your legs should be close together. Brace your abs.

Keeping your core engaged, slide your knees in toward your chest. Do not let your butt go up in the air or your body bounce as you tuck your knees in. Feel your abs and quads working to pull your knees in as your shoulders work to keep you stable.

Do not let your upper back round or your butt go up in the air as you tuck.

Then straighten your legs back out and repeat. Make sure to keep your hands under your shoulders as you move back into the Plank position with your body in a nice straight line.

This is another great move that you can do on the sliders or even the Suspension Trainer as well.

Plank with Oblique Knee Tuck – To add some variety to the Plank with Knee Tucks, you can do an Oblique Knee Tuck instead. The Oblique Knee Tuck will work your core and really target your obliques.

To do the Plank with Oblique Knee Tucks, set up in the Plank position with your body in a nice straight line from your head to your heels. Your legs should be close together and your hands should be under your shoulders.

Then tuck your knees in toward your chest and, as you do, twist your core and rotate your knees toward the outside of one elbow.

Bring them up toward the outside of one elbow and then kick them out back center so you are back in the Plank position. Then repeat the tuck, bringing them in toward the other elbow.

Keep your butt down as you tuck and twist. Keep alternating tucks until all reps are complete.

Beginners may need to stick with the basic Plank with Knee Tuck.

Mountain Climbers – Mountain Climbers are another great cardio core move and not only challenging for the advanced exerciser, but also a great way to work up to the Plank with Knee Tuck.

The Mountain Climbers on the Slide Board are even more quad-intensive than Basic Mountain Climbers and require a lot of core strength and shoulder stability to keep your body in a nice straight line.

To do Mountain Climbers on the Slide Board, set up in a Plank position with your hands under your shoulders and your body in a nice straight line down to your heels.

Keeping your core tight and butt down, run one knee in toward your chest. As you straighten that leg back out, bring the other knee in.

Run as quick as you can, driving one knee in then the other. Try to keep your core engaged so that you don’t bounce too much or let your butt go up in the air. Also, do not let yourself push yourself backward so that your hands are way out in front of your shoulders. Make your shoulders and core work by keeping everything aligned.

Beginners may need to start out slower or even do this from the ground so that they can run their knees in while their other foot is planted and not able to slip away.

Mountain Climbers can also be done on sliders or from a Suspension Trainer.

Plank Jacks – Another great cardio-core move, Plank Jacks are also a great inner and outer thigh exercise when done on the Slide Board. Because you can slide your legs open and slide them closed, you can really target your adductors as well as your abductors, external rotators and glutes.

To do Plank Jacks, set up in a Plank position with your feet together. Then bracing your core and keeping your body in a nice straight line, slide your legs open.

Use your glutes and outer thighs to open your legs up. Then pull your legs closed using your inner thighs.

Feel your legs work to open and close as your core works to keep your body still. You want to fight the urge to bounce or allow your hips to go up in the air or sag toward the ground. Also, do not let your upper back round and make sure you don’t let your hands drift way out in front of your shoulders.

Beginners can do these on sliders or without any equipment at all; however, doing these without sliders or a Slide Board takes away some of the challenge for your legs and instead makes them more cardio.

Fly Push Ups – If you want to work your chest, shoulders, triceps and core, this is a must-do move. It is also a very challenging Push Up variation so make sure you can perform a Push Up with good form before advancing.

The Fly Push Up is a great way to really target your chest with the Push Up while still working your entire core.

To do the Fly Push Up, place the booties on your hands and set up in a Plank Position with your hands under your shoulders and your body in a nice straight line to your heels. You can place your feet together to make the move harder or spread your feet out a bit to give yourself a wider base.

Then slide both hands out to wider than shoulder-width and, as you slide them open, lower your chest down toward the ground to perform a Push Up. Keep your body in a nice straight line as you lower down and do not let your shoulders shrug or your elbows flare way up by your head.

Lower yourself down as close to the ground as you can then press back up and, as you press back up, pull your hands in and back under your shoulders. You can slide them all the way together even if you want.

Then repeat the Fly Push Up. Make sure that as you go, your core stays tight and your body moves as one unit.

Beginners can do these from the ground or even using sliders. They can also do a variation where they only slide one hand out at a time. Click here for other Fly Push Up Variations.

Single-Leg Push Up With Knee Tuck – If you’re an advanced exerciser looking for a new challenge, then you have to do the Single Leg Push Up with Knee Tuck. It makes the Push Up an even more core-intensive move!

To do the Single-Leg Push Up with Knee Tuck, place the booties on your feet and set up in a Plank position with your hands just outside your chest and your feet together. Then raise one leg up off the ground.

Perform a Push Up, dropping your chest toward the ground. Do not let your shoulders shrug or your elbows flare up by your ears.

Press back up to the top of the Push Up and then tuck your knees in toward one elbow. Do not touch the raised foot down as you slide and tuck using your one leg.

Then straighten your leg back out center and perform another Push Up before sliding your knees in toward the opposite elbow.

You can switch legs after each tuck or you can perform a tuck to each side before switching. You can even complete all reps on one leg and then switch.

Shoulder Reaches – Another great shoulder and core move, especially if you want to build shoulder stability, is Shoulder Reaches. This is a great anti-rotational move that makes you move in every direction as your core stabilizes.

To do Shoulder Reaches, place the booties on your hands and set up in a Plank position with your hands under your shoulders and your feet wide. The wider your feet are apart, the easier the move will be.

Then, keeping your core still, reach one hand out in front, to the side, at an angle, or back toward your toes. Basically you can slide one hand out in any direction. You can choose to do a few different directions or only pick one or two.

Move slowly as you slide the hand out and reach out as far as you can while not letting your core sink or your butt go up in the air. You want to keep your hips still as you reach out.

Alternate sides or complete all reaches on one side before switching.

Beginners can do this from their knees or from the ground instead of on the Slide Board.

Even if you don’t have a Slide Board, many of these moves can be done using sliders (or towels) or even a Suspension Trainer. Use these moves to get in a full-body, core-intensive workout that is sure to get your blood pumping!

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